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Yusif Khalil Abdallah Nur

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Template:Infobox WoT detainees

Yusif Khalil Abdallah Nur is a citizen of Saudi Arabia, who was held in extrajudicial detention in the United States Guantanamo Bay detainment camps, in Cuba.[1] Nur's Guantanamo Internment Serial Number was 73. The Department of Defense reports that he was born on March 16, 1982, in Mecca, Saudi Arabia. Nur was repatriated without ever been charged on June 24, 2006.[2]

Identity

A most wanted poster, from the Defense Intelligence Agency, asserts that a suspect named Abdul Rahman Abdallah Noor is a former Guantanamo captive.[3] However Abdul Rahman Abdallah Noor's name is not on the official list of all the Guantanamo captives.[1] According to the DIA his alias is Abd al-Rahman Bin Khalil Bin Abdallah Nur.

Both men are from Saudi Arabia, but Abdul Rahman Abdallah Noor date of birth is reported to have been January 2, 1980.

One of the factors offered to justify Yusif Khalil Abdallah Nur's continued detention was that he was named on a suspicious list.[4]

On the Summary of Evidence memo prepared for his second annual review board in 2006 his name was transliterated as "Yusef K Abdullah".[5]

Combatant Status Review

Template:CSRT-Yes[6]

a. The detainee is a member of the Taliban
  1. Prior to his arrival in Afghanistan, the detainee admits to hearing Sheiks call for Muslims to take up the Jihad in Afghanistan.
  2. Detainee traveled in the summer of 2001 from Saudi Arabia to Pakistan then into Quetta, [sic] Afghanistan, where he sought out Taliban members.
  3. Detainee traveled to Khawaja Ghar and received weapons training in the use of hand grenades.
  4. Detainee was already familiar with the use of the Kalashnikov rifle.
  5. Detainee retreated to Konduz after bombing raids began in North Afghanistan.
  6. Detainee surrendered in Mazar-e-Sharif [sic] and was put in Jenki prison [sic] where he was wounded in the prison uprising.
b. The detainee participated in military operations against the coalition
  1. Detainee was on the frontlines in Khawaja Ghar manning a foxhole for five months.
  2. The detainee admitted that he fought with the Taliban.

Testimony in response to the allegations

The Department of Defense published a three page summarize transcript.

Nur said he didn't travel to Afghanistan for jihad. He went there to be with his beloved, older brother.[6]

Nur acknowledged calling on the Taliban to help him locate his brother.[6] He added that if his brother had been serving in the Northern Alliance he would have called on them to help him locate his brother.

Nur acknowledged that his brother showed him how to use hand grenades.[6] But he claimed that he did not use any weapons while he was in Afghanistan, not even taking a turn performing guard duty.He was considered too young to participate.

Nur acknowledged that he was familiar with the use of the Kalashnikov.[6]

Nur claimed that when the US bombing campaign began he and his brother were ordered to try to return to Saudi Arabia.[6] But all the roads were blocked. So he and his brother stayed with his brother's group, until it retrated to Konduz.

Nur acknowledged surrendering at Mazari Sharif; being sent to the al-Jenki prison; and being wounded in the uprising.[6] But he asserted he didn't participate in the uprising.

The second part of the first allegation of hostile activity was that Nur had manned a foxhole for five months.[6] Nur's reply was:

"Yes, I was with my brother on the front lines but being in charge for five months, that's the first time I ever heard of this. I was in charge? They never even let me do my guard turn so how could I be in charge?"

Testimony in response to the Tribunal officer's questions

In response to questions from the Tribunal officer's questions[6]:

  • Nur answered that his brother was also in the al-Jenki prison. But he never saw him after the uprising, and he didn't know what had happened to him.
  • Nur had reached College, and spent his first two months in College, prior to traveling to Afghanistan.
  • Nur's brother's name was Adjhar Rhaman [sic]. He is two or three years older than Nur.
  • Nur learned to use the Kalashnikov on a previous trip to Afghanistan.
  • Nur denied participating in the prison uprising. He said he was bound in restraints when the revolt began, and when he was injured.
  • Nur said he was injured in the stomach during the uprising.
  • Nur said that his brother had talked him into his first, one month trip to Afghanistan, by criticizing his lifestyle, his lack of goals, and his lack of commitment to Islam.
  • Nur denied believing in jihad.
  • Nur said he traveled to Afghanistan legally on his Saudi passport, and that his brother had paid his travel expenses.

Administrative Review Board

Captives whose CSRT labeled them "enemy combatants" were scheduled for annual Administrative Review Board hearings. These hearings were designed to judge whether the captive still posed a threat if repatriated to their home country.[7]

First annual Administrative Review Board hearing

A Summary of Evidence memo was drafted for his first annual Administrative Review Board hearing in 2005.[8]

The following primary factors favor continued detention

a. Commitment
  1. Prior to his arrival in Afghanistan, detainee admits hearing Sheiks call for muslims to take up the jihad in Afghanistan.
  2. The detainee stated it was his "duty" to travel to Afghanistan and fight with the Taliban forces who were fighting against the Northern Alliance.
  3. Upon his arrival in Quetta, Pakistan, the detainee entered a taxi and asked to be taken to the "Taliban Building," where he spent the night with other Arabs.
  4. The detainee traveled in the summer of 2001 from Saudi Arabia to Pakistan then into Quetta, Afghanistan, where he sought out Taliban members.
  5. While in Quetta, the detainee told Taliban members that he was on his way to the "front line" in Kabul.
  6. Leaving Quetta the detainee traveled with four other males, including at least one member of the Taliban, to Kabul, where he was then transported to the "secondary line" and met up with his brother. Later they were on the front line, where he was issued a weapon.
  7. The detainee surrendered in Mazar-E-Sharif [sic] and was put in Jenki prison [sic] where he was wounded in the prison uprising.
b. Training
  1. The detainee traveled to Khawajaghar [sic] and received weapons training in the use of hand grenades.
  2. The detainee made a separate, earlier trip to Afghanistan to train on the use of a Kalashnikov.
c. Connections/Associations
  1. The detainee admitted that one of his brothers had traveled to Afghanistan to fight with the Taliban forces.
  2. The detainee's name and information was found on a list of Arabic names, aliases, and nationalities recovered from safe house raids associated with suspected al Qaida in Karachi, Pakistan.
  3. The detainee stayed in safe houses at Kandahar and Kabul, Afghanistan, which were used by the Taliban to process and lodge Arabs traveling in Afghanistan to participate in the jihad.
  4. In early 2001, detainee left weapons training at Melek Center in Kabul, Afghanistan, to return to Saudi Arabia for the Hajj. During this travel, he was detained with another Saudi detainee at a Bahrain airport, questioned about their time in Afghanistan, and released. A tape of Bin Laden calling for jihad was confiscated from the accompanying Saudi detainee by Bahrain customs agents.
d. Intent
  1. Prior to departing for the frontlines, the detainee was issued one Kalashnikov, three magazines and two hand grenades.
  2. The detainee was on the frontlines in Khawajaghar manning a foxhole for five months.
e. CSRT
  1. The detainee said his brother taught him how to use hand grenades.
  2. The detainee admitted that he had a Kalashnikov and some hand grenades when he surrendered at Mazar-e-Sharif

The following primary factors favor release or repatriation

a. The detainee stated that, although he heard Imams talking about fatwa for Muslims to take up the jihad in Afghanistan, he went to Afghanistan to be with his brother, not to be part of the Taliban. The detainee stated that he had an older brother who was already in Afghanistan and the detainee wanted to go and stay with him for four months, then return to Saudi Arabia.
b. The detainee stated that although his brother called him a few times from Kabul to try to convince him to go to Afghanistan, he does not have any knowledge of his brother (Abdul Rahman) [sic] recruiting for the Taliban in Saudi Arabia.
c. The detainee stated that if he were to be released, he would like to return to Taif, Saudi Arabia where he would attempt to go to college and continue his education. The detainee explained that prior to traveling to Afghanistan, he was enrolled at a teacher's college for approximately two months. The detainee stated that he was interested in pursuing a degree in religious studies. He added however, that if released, he would likely change his focus to studying the Arabic language, or perhaps Biology.
d. The detainee claims he was never associated with al Qaida and says he understands why the Americans are pursuing Usama Bin Laden and says that the actions of Usama Bin Laden and al Qaida have brought shame to the Islamic community.

Transcript

Nur chose to participate in his Administrative Review Board hearing.[9] The Department of Defense published a ten page summarized transcript from the unclassified session of his hearing.

Second annual Administrative Review Board hearing

A four page Summary of Evidence memo was drafted for his second annual Administrative Review Board hearing in 2006.[5] The four page memo listed twenty-four "primary factors favor[ing] continued detention" and eight "primary factors favor[ing] release or transfer".

(U) The following primary factors favor continued detention

a. (U) Commitment
  1. The Detainee attended Friday prayer at the Ali Shauk mosque shortly after the Taliban had destroyed the Buddha statues in Afghanistan. The Imam began to preach about the jihad in Afghanistan and the recent destruction of the Buddha statues. The Imam supported the actions of the Taliban and encouraged the congregation to travel to Afghanistan to participate in jihad.
  2. After hearing the talks that supported the Taliban as well as persuasion by his brother, the Detainee agreed to travel and fight in Afghanistan. The Detainee stated that it was his duty to travel to Afghanistan and fight with the Taliban forces who were fighting against the Northern Alliance.
  3. According to the Detainee , religious fatwas helped to fuel his interest in going to Afghanistan.
  4. The Detainee identified the following route of travel to Afghanistan: he flew to Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, then to Doha, Qatar, and finally to Karachi, Pakistan. Upon arrival in Karachi the Detainee stayed at the El Haram Hotel.
  5. The Detainee was instructed by his brother to leave Karachi and go to the Daftar Taliban in Quetta, Pakistan.
  6. The Detainee traveled by bus to Quetta, Pakistan. Upon arrival at Quetta, he went to the Taliban Building and then traveled to Kabul, Afghanistan. Upon his arrival in Kabul, the Detainee took a taxi to Dar El Aman, which was identified as the house of security.
  7. The Detainee was united with his brother after the Detainee arrived in Kabul.
  8. The Detainee stated that once he and his brother entered Afghanistan, they stopped in Kandahar at an unknown Taliban guesthouse. The Detainee and his brother then traveled to Kabul, Afghanistan. The Detainee and an al Qaida operative then traveled to the Malek center in Kabul.
  9. The Detainee stated that after spending some time in Kabul , Afghanistan, he and his brother took a flight to Konduz, Afghanistan.
  10. According to the Detainee, after arriving in Konduz, Afghanistan, he and his brother rode in a truck to Taloqan, Afghanistan.
  11. The Detainee and his brother stayed outside of the Malek center before their training began.
  12. According to the Detainee, the Malek center is used to support Taliban fighters by training foreign fighters in basic riflemanship. The center also provides Taliban fighters who return from the front lines with a place to rest and relax.
b. (U) Training
The Detainee stated that upon his arrival to the Kwahjaghar area of operation, Afghanistan, he met a Yemeni individual. While in the rear area of Kwahjaghar, the Detainee trained with his brother in the use of hand grenades. After training, both the Detainee and his brother were sent to the front lines of Kwahjaghar.
c. (U) Connections/Associations
  1. The Detainee's older brother left Ta'if, Saudi Arabia to join the Taliban in Afghanistan and called the Detainee a few times from Kabul, Afghanistan to convince him to go to Afghanistan. The Detainee did not want to go at that time.
  2. The Detainee stated that one of his brothers advised him how to travel to Afghanistan.
  3. The Detainee stated that he received some money from one of his older brothers who was not aware that the money would be used to finance the Detainee's travel to and fighting in Afghanistan.
  4. The Detainee was stationed with his brother on the front lines of Kwahjaghar at a Taliban position known as Tamim center.
d. (U) Intent
e. (U) Other Relevant Data
  1. The Detainee and his brother were at Kwahjaghar with other Arabs.
  2. The Detainee has identified the person in charge of the group of Arabs as Abd Al Salam Al Hudrami.
  3. The Detainee and his brother were positioned in the village when the bombing campaign began. Shortly thereafter, the Detainee and his brother elected to depart Afghanistan, but Hudrami said that they were unable to leave because the Afghanistan borders were closed.
  4. Hudrami was killed during the bombing campaign. Abd Gharib was in charge when the group of Arabs was told to withdraw.
  5. The Detainee and the group of Arabs traveled from Kwahjaghar to Konduz, Afghanistan. They were told that the area had fallen and that they must travel to Kandahar, Afghanistan. The group traveled through Mazar-E Sharif on their way to Kandahar.
  6. The Detainee and the group surrendered their weapons at Mazar-E Sharif and were then taken to a castle called Jenki and placed in a prison.
  7. The Detainee stated there was an explosion and an eruption of gunfire at Jenki during which time he received a gunshot wound to the abdominal area and was rendered unconscious. The Detainee's brother was killed in the prison.

(U) The following primary factors favor release or transfer

  1. The Detainee has denied having any knowledge of the attacks in the United States prior to their execution on 11 September 2001.
  2. The Detainee has denied knowledge of any rumors or plans of future attacks on the United States or United States interests.
  3. The Detainee denied any personal knowledge of planning of internal uprisings at the Guantanamo Bay detention facility.
  4. The Detainee had no knowledge of al Qaida recruiting for the Taliban in Saudi Arabia.
  5. The Detainee has stated that if released, he would like to return to Taif, Saudi Arabia where he would attempt to go to college and continue his education.
  6. The Detainee claims that he was never associated with al Qaida.
  7. The Detainee claims he had no real knowledge of the cause of the Taliban or the socioeconomic, political, or religious conditions in Afghanistan. The Detainee simply wanted to be with his brother.
  8. The Detainee stated that he decided to join his brother in Afghanistan due to their closeness rather than a real desire to participate in jihad.

Repatriation

On November 26, 2008 the Department of Defense published a list of the dates when captives were transferred from Guantanamo.[10] According to that list he was transferred on June 24, 2006. Thirteen other men were repatriated with him.[11]

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 OARDEC (2006-03-15). "List of Individuals Detained by the Department of Defense at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba from January 2002 through May 15, 2006". United States Department of Defense. http://www.dod.mil/news/May2006/d20060515%20List.pdf. Retrieved 2007-09-29. 
  2. "Yusif Khalil Abdallah Nur – The Guantánamo Docket". The New York Times (The New York Times Company). http://projects.nytimes.com/guantanamo/detainees/73-yusif-khalil-abdallah-nur. Retrieved 12 January 2010. 
  3. "Most Wanted, Afghanistan/Pakistan" (PDF). Defense Intelligence Agency. October 2006. p. 29–30. http://www.dia.mil/site6_images/cards/AF-PK.pdf. Retrieved 2007-03-14. 
  4. [[[:Template:DoD detainees ARB]] Summarized transcript (.pdf)], from Yusif Khalil Abdallah Nur's Administrative Review Board hearing - page 1
  5. 5.0 5.1 OARDEC (2006-02-12). "Unclassified Summary of Evidence for Administrative Review Board in the case of Abdullah, Yusef K". United States Department of Defense. http://projects.nytimes.com/guantanamo/detainees/73-yusif-khalil-abdallah-nur/documents/3/pages/146#21. Retrieved 2009-09-09. 
  6. 6.0 6.1 6.2 6.3 6.4 6.5 6.6 6.7 6.8 OARDEC (date redacted). "Summarized Unsworn Detainee Statement". United States Department of Defense. pp. pages 44-46. http://www.dod.mil/pubs/foi/detainees/csrt_arb/Set_44_2922-3064.pdf#44-46. Retrieved 2009-08-01. 
  7. Book, Spc. Timothy. The Wire (JTF-GTMO Public Affairs Office), "Review process unprecedented", March 10, 2006
  8. OARDEC (2005-02-28). "Unclassified Summary of Evidence for Administrative Review Board in the case of Nur, Yusif Khalil Abdallah". United States Department of Defense. http://int-shared1.ec2.nytimes.com/guantanamo/detainees/73-yusif-khalil-abdallah-nur/documents/1/pages/1234#8. Retrieved 2009-08-01. 
  9. OARDEC (date redacted). "Summarized Administrative Review Board Detainee Statement". United States Department of Defense. pp. pages 1-10. http://www.dod.mil/pubs/foi/detainees/csrt_arb/ARB_Transcript_Set_4_1431-1455.pdf#1. Retrieved 2009-08-01. 
  10. OARDEC (2008-10-09). "Consolidated chronological listing of GTMO detainees released, transferred or deceased". Department of Defense. http://www.dod.mil/pubs/foi/detainees/09-F-0031_doc1.pdf. Retrieved 2008-12-28. 
  11. "Fourteen Guantanamo detainees returned to the Kingdom". Royal Saudi Embassy, Washington, D.C.. June 25, 2006. Archived from the original on 2009-09-07. http://www.webcitation.org/query?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.saudiembassy.net%2Farchive%2F2006%2Fnews%2Fpage453.aspx&date=2009-09-07. Retrieved 2007-03-10. 

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