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Tell en-Nasbeh

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Tell en-Nasbeh is an archaeological site northwest of Jerusalem believed by some to be the Biblical Mizpah in Benjamin.[1]

Nasbeh was excavated by William F. Badè of the Pacific School of Religion from 1926-1935. Badè died before he was able to publish his findings. The original dig records have been analyzed and published by Jeffrey R. Zorn of Cornell University.

Tell en-Nasbeh was a small village in the Late Chalcolithic and Early Bronze I periods. It was then abandoned until the tenth century (Iron Age) when it became a sizeble agricultural village. By Iron Age II it was a walled settlement with a massive city gate on the frontier between the northern and southern Israelite kingdoms.[1]

A new strata appears at the time of the Babylonian conquest (586 BCE) signifying the town's new role as the Babylonian administrative center for the district of Binyamin.[1]

However, if Mizpah in Benjamin was Tell en-Nasbeh on the Nablus road, Ishmael who had assassinated Gedaliah would not have fled to Ammon via Gibeon [2] which is located to the West near Neby Samwil which overlooks Jerusalem. Furthermore, Judas Machabeus, preparing for war with the Syrians, gathered his men "to Maspha, over against Jerusalem: for in Maspha was a place of prayer heretofore in Israel".[3]


External links

References

Some or all of this article is forked from Wikipedia. The original article was at Tell en-Nasbeh. The list of authors can be seen in the page history.

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 http://www.arts.cornell.edu/jrz3/frames2.htm
  2. http://www.mechon-mamre.org/p/pt/pt1141.htm Jeremiah Chapter 41 Verse 10-12] Mechon Mamre
  3. I Mach., iii, 46, cited in Wikisource-logo.svg "Maspha". Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton Company. 1913. http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Catholic_Encyclopedia_(1913)/Maspha. 

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