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Tefnut

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Tefnut
Goddess of moisture
Name in hieroglyphs
t
f
n
t
I13
Major cult center Heliopolis, Leontopolis
Symbol Lioness
Siblings Shu
Consort Shu

In Egyptian religion, Tefnut (alternate spellings Tefenet, Tefnet) is a goddess with a connection to moisture[1].

Family

Together with Shu, the god of air, Tefnut is one of the twins who were the first born of Atum. The offspring of these two are Nut, the sky and Geb, the earth. Tefnut's grandchildren were Osiris, Isis, Set and Nephthys. With their father, children and grandchildren Tefnut is from the Ennead of Heliopolis. In Heliopolis she had a sanctuary called the Lower Menset.[2]

Etymology

The name Tefnut has been linked to the verb 'tfn' meaning 'to spit'[3] and versions of the creation myth say that Atum spat her out and her name was written as a pair of lips spitting in late texts.[4] In the earlier Pyramid Texts she is said to produce pure waters from her vagina.[5]Alternate spellings of goddess' name are Tefenet, Tefnet.

Mythology

Tefnet was often represented as a lioness and was thus connected with other leonine goddesses as the Eye of Ra. As her brother and consort Shu was also sometimes depicted as a lion they were worshiped as a pair of lions in Leontopolis in the Delta.[6] As a lioness she could display a wrathful aspect and is said to escape to Nubia in a rage from where she is brought back by Thoth.[7]

References

  1. The Routledge Dictionary of Egyptian Gods and Goddesses, George Hart ISBN0-415-34495-6
  2. The Routledge Dictionary of Egyptian Gods and Goddesses, George Hart ISBN0-415-34495-6
  3. http://henadology.wordpress.com/theology/netjeru/tefnut
  4. The Complete Gods and Goddesses of Ancient Egypt, Wilkinson, page. 183 ISBN 0-500-05120-8
  5. The Ancient Egyptian Pyramid Texts, trans R.O. Faulkner, line 2065 Utt. 685.
  6. The Routledge Dictionary of Egyptian Gods and Goddesses, George Hart ISBN0-415-34495-6,
  7. The Complete Gods and Goddesses of Ancient Egypt, Wilkinson, page. 183 ISBN 0-500-05120-8
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This page uses content from the English Wikipedia. The original article was at Tefnut. The list of authors can be seen in the page history.

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