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Periphas (Ancient Greek: Περίφας, genitive: -αντος) in Greek mythology may refer to:

  • Periphas, one of the sons of Aegyptus. He married (and was killed by) Actaea, daughter of Danaus.[1]
  • Periphas, a son of Oeneus.[2]
  • Periphas, a son of Lapithes in Thessaly. He consorted with Astyagyia, daughter of Hypseus, and had by her eight sons, of whom the eldest, Antion, was a possible father of Ixion with Perimela.[3]
  • Periphas, one of the Lapiths at the wedding of Pirithous and Hippodamia.[4] May or may not be identical with the above son of Lapithes.
  • Periphas, an Attica autochthon, previous to the time of Cecrops I, was a priest of Apollo, and on account of his virtues he was made king; but as he was honoured to the same extent as Zeus, the latter wished to destroy him. At the request of Apollo, however, Zeus metamorphosed him into an eagle, and his wife Phene likewise into a bird.[5][6]
  • Periphas, son of the Aetolian Ochesius, fell by the hand of Ares in the Trojan War.[7]
  • Periphas, a son of Epytus, and a herald of Aeneas.[8]
  • Periphas, a companion of Neoptolemus who took part in the destruction of Troy.[9]
  • Periphas, same as Hyperphas.[10]
  • Periphas, one of the suitors of Penelope.[11]
  • Periphas, one of the five sons of Arrhetus who fought against Dionysus in the Indian War.[12]

References

  1. Pseudo-Apollodorus, Bibliotheca 2. 1. § 5
  2. Antoninus Liberalis, Metamorphoses, 2
  3. Diodorus Siculus, Library of History, 4. 69. 2 - 3
  4. Ovid, Metamorphoses 12. 449
  5. Antoninus Liberalis, Metamorphoses 6
  6. Ovid, Metamorphoses 7. 400
  7. Homer, Iliad, 5. 842
  8. Homer, Iliad, 17. 323
  9. Virgil, Aeneid 2. 476
  10. Scholia on Euripides, Phoenician Women, 63
  11. Pseudo-Apollodorus, Bibliotheca, Epitome of Book 4, 7. 29
  12. Nonnus, Dionysiaca, 26. 257

This article incorporates text from the public domain Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology by William Smith (1870).

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This page uses content from the English Wikipedia. The original article was at Periphas. The list of authors can be seen in the page history.

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