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Old Ohavi Zedek Synagogue
U.S. National Register of Historic Places
OldOhaviZedek.JPG
[[image:Template:Location map Vermont|235px|Old Ohavi Zedek Synagogue is located in Template:Location map Vermont]]
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Location: Archibald and Hyde Sts., Burlington, Vermont
Coordinates: 44°29′18″N 73°12′26″W / 44.48833°N 73.20722°W / 44.48833; -73.20722Coordinates: 44°29′18″N 73°12′26″W / 44.48833°N 73.20722°W / 44.48833; -73.20722
Built/Founded: 1885
Governing body: Private
Added to NRHP: January 31, 1978
NRHP Reference#: 78000233[1]

Old Ohavi Zedek Synagogue (Hebrew for "Lovers of Justice") is a historic synagogue building in Burlington, Vermont currently occupied by Congregation Ahavath Gerim.


History

Founded in 1885, Ohavi Zedek is the oldest Jewish congregation in Vermont.[2] In 1952 the congregation moved to its present home on North Prospect Street in Burlington.

The original building at the corner Archibald and Hyde Streets is a brick Gothic Revival structure erected in 1885; it is among the oldest synagogue buildings still standing in the United States.[3]

The building is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. It is now occupied by Congregation Ahavath Gerim.[4]

References

  1. "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 2009-03-13. http://www.nr.nps.gov/. 
  2. The story of the Jewish community of Burlington, Vermont: from early times to 1946, with much about the Jewish community in the state, By Myron Samuelson, 1976
  3. Rediscovering Jewish Infrastructure: Update on United States Nineteenth Century Synagogues, Mark W. Gordon, American Jewish History 84.1 (1996) 11-27 [1]
  4. http://ahavathgerim.blogspot.com/

See also

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