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Nicholas G. Smith

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Nicholas Groesbeck Smith (20 June 188127 October 1945) was a general authority of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church). Born in Salt Lake City, Utah Territory, Smith was the son of LDS Church Apostle John Henry Smith and Josephine Groesbeck. At age three he had gone to England with his parents, where his father was serving as a church mission president.[1]

Smith was baptized by his father on his eighth birthday.[2] From 1902 to 1905 Smith served as a LDS Church missionary in the Netherlands. During part of the time he was on his mission he was president of the Amsterdam District of the church.[3]

In 1913, Smith was called by Church President Joseph F. Smith to serve as president of the South African Mission of the church. He served in this capacity until 1921. In 1922 Brother Smith became bishop of the 17th Ward in Salt Lake City.

Some LDS Church sources state that Nicholas G. Smith served as Acting Presiding Patriarch of the LDS Church between 1932 and 1934.[4] However, Smith was never sustained to this calling in a General Conference. It is unknown whether he was ordained or set apart to serve in this office or calling.

Starting in 1935 Brother Smith served as president of the California Mission.[5] After that he served as a counselor to Stephen L. Chipman in the presidency of the Salt Lake Temple until 1940 when Brother Smith was called as president of the Northwestern States Mission, succeeding Preston Nibley.

On 6 April 1941, Brother Smith was called by LDS Church President Heber J. Grant to be one of the first five Assistants to the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles, a position which he held until his death in Salt Lake City from a coronary occlusion.[6]

Smith was married to Florence Gay and was the father of four sons: Girard Gay, John Henry, Stanford Groesbeck, and Nicholas Groesbeck Jr.

See also


  1. LDS Biographical Encyclopedia, vol 4, p. 167
  2. Jenson, Andrew. LDS Biographical Encyclopedia. (Salt Lake City: Andrew Jenson Memorial Association, 1936) Vol. 4, p. 167.
  3. LDS Biographical Encyclopedia. Vol. 4, p. 167.
  4. Ludlow, Daniel H., ed. (1992). Encyclopedia of Mormonism. New York: Macmillan Publishing. pp. "Presiding Patriarch". ISBN 978-0-02-879602-4. 
  5. Confernce Report, April 1935
  6. State of Utah Death Certificate

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