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Meroz, (Grk. Μερώζ) (Heb. mer 'oz) Of unknown origin. refuge

Thought to be a city within the plains of Galilee north of Mt. Tabor in Israel which was cursed by the angel of God in the song of Deborah and Barak; whose inhabitants did not come to help the Israelites in battle against Sisera's army. Meroz may possibly be identified with el-Murussus, a village about 5 miles Northwest of Beisan, on the slopes to the North of the Vale of Jezreel. The village of Kafr Misr has also been identified as a possible site, due its proximity to other nearby ancient sites such as Nein (Nain) and Indur (Endor).[1]

Curse ye Meroz, said the angel of God, curse ye bitterly the inhabitants thereof; because they came not to the help of YHWH, to the help of God against the mighty.

-Judges 5:23

Meroz in Kabbalistic Thought

Meroz is only mentioned once in scripture and has a strange fate, shared with that of Chorazin (Matt. 11:21), to be preserved from oblivion only by the record of a curse that was sentenced upon it. One must notice that the curse upon Meroz was not because of what they did, but rather because of what they didn't do. According to the Talmud (Moed Katan 16a), Meroz is a certain planet in the stellar sphere, and because the mention of it in Judges 5:23 is preceded by the phrase, "the stars in their course fought against Sisera" (v.20), it thus follows that Meroz must be defined as a celestial body. [2] This mysterious 'Meroz' may not only be the name of a star, but also may allude to an unidentified group of outworld inhabitants somewhere in the second heaven (outer space) to which failed in their willingness to assist the righteous in a war against the wicked, and hence cursed by the angel of God.

See also Sisera

See Ewing, W.. "Meroz," International Standard Bible Encyclopaedia 1913.


Some or all of this article is forked from Wikipedia. The original article was at Meroz. The list of authors can be seen in the page history.


  • Wilson, John (1847). The Lands of the Bible Visited and Described, Volume 2. White. 

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