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Malachi Brendan Martin
200px
Born July 23, 1921(1921-07-23)
Ballylongford, County Kerry,
Irish Republic
Died July 27, 1999 (aged 78)
Manhattan, New York,
USA
Nationality Irish, US-citizen
Occupation Priest, Professor at the Vatican's Pontifical Biblical Institute, exorcist, theologian, author

Malachi Brendan Martin Ph.D. (July 23, 1921 – July 27, 1999) was a Catholic priest, theologian, writer on the Catholic Church, and professor at the Vatican's Pontifical Biblical Institute. He held five doctorates[1] and was the author of sixteen books which covered religious and geo-political topics. He wrote additional books under pen names and in collaboration with others. He was a controversial commentator on the Vatican and other matters involving the Church.[2]

Early life and education

Martin was born in the village of Ballylongford, County Kerry, in the Irish Republic. He received his secondary education at Belvedere College in Dublin, and became a Jesuit novice on September 6, 1939. Due to the Second World War and the inherent risks involved with travel during this time, Malachi remained in Ireland and studied at the National University of Ireland where he received a bachelor's degree in Semitic languages, and Oriental history while carrying out concurrent study in Assyriology at Trinity College.

Upon completion in Dublin, Malachi was sent to the Catholic University of Leuven in Belgium to continue with his scholarly learnings. During the four year stay in Leuven he completed masters degrees in philosophy, theology, Semitic languages, archeology and Oriental history. On August 15, 1954, the day of the Feast of the Assumption, Martin was ordained a Jesuit Priest.

Father Martin commenced with parallel studies at both the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and at Oxford University, specializing in intertestamentary studies and knowledge of Jesus Christ from Hebrew and Arabic manuscripts. He undertook additional study in rational psychology, experimental psychology, physics and anthropology.[3]

Work and ordination

Father Martin took part in the research of the Dead Sea Scrolls, and published twenty four articles on Semitic paleography in various journals.

He was summoned to Rome to work within the Holy See and act as the private secretary for Augustin Cardinal Bea S.J. from 1958 until 1964. This brought him into close contact with Pope John XXIII. His years in Rome coincided with the start of the Second Vatican Council (1962-65), which was to transform the Catholic Church in a way that the initially-liberal Martin began to find distressing.

While in Rome, he became a professor at the Pontifical Biblical Institute of the Vatican, where he taught Aramaic, paleography, Hebrew and Sacred Scripture.

Disillusioned by the reforms taking place among the Jesuits, the Church's largest religious order, Martin requested a release from his vows of poverty and obedience in 1964 from Pope Paul VI personally, and left Rome suddenly that June. He was not released from his vow of chastity.[4]

After a brief stay in Paris, Martin relocated to New York City in 1965, where he first had to make ends meet as a dishwasher and taxi driver before being able to make his living by his writings. He co-founded an antiques firm and was active in the communications and media field for the rest of his life.[5]

After his arrival in New York, Terence Cardinal Cooke gave him written permission to exercise his priestly faculties. The cardinal advised him to find lodging with a family rather than live alone as he initially did. He moved to the Manhattan home of Kakia Livanos and her family. She was his landlady and provided his rooms, his meals, and the oratory where he said daily Mass.[4]

Communications and media

At the end of the ‘60s, Martin, under the pseudonym Michael Serafian, wrote The Pilgrim, an apologia for the Jews, which, among other things, castigated the Church for not recognizing the validity of judaism. Afterwards came liberally oriented books like The Encounter, Three Popes and a Cardinal and Jesus Now.

Martin became an American citizen in 1970. He received a Guggenheim fellowship, which enabled him to write his first bestseller, Hostage to the Devil. With this book, published in 1975, Martin appeared to have retreated to the more orthodox mode of exorcist. According to the book, he assisted in several exorcisms.

Psychiatrist M. Scott Peck, author of The Road Less Travelled, developed a friendship with Martin and was influenced by the latter in the development of his theories of evil and exorcism. During that decade, he also served a stint as religion editor for National Review.

Opinions

Martin was also a member of the Vatican advisory council and was privileged to secretive information pertaining to Vatican and other world issues,[6] which included the appartions of Our Lady in Fatima. He spoke and wrote often about the three secrets of Fatima and was an ardent supporter of Fr. Nicholas Gruner in this.

Martin worked closely with the paranormal researchers Dave Considine and John Zaffis on several of their independent cases.

He was an outspoken opponent of the alleged apparitions of the Virgin Mary at Bayside in the United States and Međugorje in former Yugoslavia.[7] Concerning the Garabandal apparitions, he remained open minded.[8]

Martin continued to offer Mass privately and vigorously exercised his priestly ministry all the way up until his death. He was a periodic guest on Art Bell's radio program, Coast to Coast AM, between 1995 and 1998 and a guest of Michael Corbin's radio program on Paranet Continuum radio.

In the last three years of his life, Martin had forged a close friendship with the traditional Catholic philosopher, Dr. Rama Coomaraswamy.[9]

Martin publicly stated in March 1997 on Radio Liberty's Steel on Steel, hosted by John Loefller, that two popes were murdered during the Twentieth century. He stated that pope Pius XI was ingeniously murdered on the orders of Benito Mussolini, because of his 1931 encyclical Non Abbiamo Bisogno harshly criticizing the Italian fascist state. He further stated that pope John Paul I was also murdered. [10] The reason for this last murder Martin gives in his novel Vatican: A Novel, where he identifies the Cardinal secretary of state under pope Paul VI, Jean-Marie Villot, as the murderer, who acted on orders from the U.S.S.R.. [11]

Martin also gave credency to the Siri Thesis by publicly aknowledgeging that Giuseppe Cardinal Siri was twice elected pope in papal conclaves, but declined his election after being pressured by worldly forces acting through cardinals present at the conclaves. The first instance was the Papal conclave, 1963. Martin mentions the possibility of a nuclear threat which involved "the very existence of the Vatican state" during this conclave on pages 600 to 610 of his book The Keys of this Blood, which deals primarily with Siri and the 1963 conclave. The second instance was the Papal conclave, October 1978. Martin publicly stated in March 1997 on Radio Liberty's radio programme Steel on Steel, hosted by John Loefller, that Siri received a written note after his initial election threatening him and his family with death should he accept. [12]

Writings

Martin produced numerous best-selling fictional and non-fictional literary works, which became widely read throughout the world. He publicized detailed insider accounts of papal and church history during the reigns of Popes Pius XII, John XXIII, Paul VI (The Pilgrim, Three Popes and a Cardinal, Vatican: A Novel), John Paul I (The Final Conclave) and John Paul II (The Keys of This Blood, Windswept House).

His non-fictional writings cover a range of Catholic topics, such as demonic exorcisms (Hostage to the Devil), satanism, liberation theology, the Second Vatican Council (The Pilgrim), the Tridentine liturgy, Catholic dogma, modernism (Three Popes and the Cardinal; The Jesuits), financial history of the church (Rich Church, Poor Church; The Decline and Fall of the Roman Church), the new world order and the geopolitical importance of the Pope (The Keys of This Blood).

His fictional writings give an insiders view of papal and church history from pope Pius XII to pope John Paul II, of communist and masonic infiltration of the Catholic Church (The Final Conclave; Vatican, a Novel; Windswept House).

His books, both fictional and non-fictional, frequently present a dark view of the present state of the world, invoking dark spirits, conspiracy, betrayal, heresy, widespread sexual perversion, self-advancement, and demonic possession, each being asserted as rife throughout the Catholic Church, from its lowest levels up to its highest.

Controversies

Alleged affair

Malachi Martin was criticized most notably in the book Clerical Error: A True Story by Robert Blair Kaiser, Time Magazine's former Vatican correspondent. Kaiser accuses Martin of having carried on an extramarital affair with his wife and claimed that Martin fled to the United States as a renegade from the priesthood. Throughout the book, Martin is presented as a liar and fantasist. A friend of Martin's, William H. Kennedy, published an article in the journal Seattle Catholic to dispute Kaiser's allegation and refute other claims made about Martin after his death.[13] Kennedy points out that Kaiser admits in his book that he was diagnosed as having paranoid schizophrenia.[14] Kennedy cites passages from Kaiser's book which he believes show that Kaiser was writing from a distorted and delusional perspective due to his mental illness. With regard to being a renegade from the priesthood, there is published evidence suggesting that Martin received a special dispensation in order to become a writer, while retaining his status as a priest with limited faculties.[1]

Laicization dispute

In 2004, Father Vincent O'Keefe S.J., former Vicar General of the Society of Jesus and a past President of Fordham University, affirmed that Martin had never been laicized. O'Keefe stated that Martin had been released from all his priestly vows - poverty and obedience - save the vow of chastity.

It is claimed that attacks were mounted on Martin in retaliation for his book The Jesuits, which is hostile to the Jesuit order of which he had formerly been a member. In the book, he accuses the Jesuits of deviating from their original character and mission by embracing Liberation Theology.[15]

Alleged authorship

The book - The Pilgrim: Pope Paul VI, The Council and The Church in a time of decision, Farrar, Straus, New York, 1964 - was written by Martin under the pseudonym Michael Serafian.

The anonymously written book - Complaints against God by One of His Creatures, Thomas Moore Press, Chicago, 1971 - was not written by Martin but by Fr. Andrew Greeley, a liberal priest.[16][17]

The pseudonym of Xavier Rynne, used to write more then 20 books on Vatican II, is not that of Martin but of Fr. Francis X. Murphy C.s.s.R..[18]

Alleged jewish heritage

Rumors appearing on various Catholic sedesvacantist websites [19] alleged that Malachi Martin had jewish ancestry because of Iberian jews migrating to Ireland and Great-Britain in the 15th century. These allegations were proven false by William H. Kennedy in his article In Defense of Father Malachi Martin. [20] After having made genealogical inquiries with surviving relatives of Martin in Ireland, Kennedy concluded that Martin's father was an Englishman who moved to Ireland and his mother was fully Irish.

Death

Martin died after a fall in his apartment in Manhattan, New York, in 1999. His funeral wake took place in St. Anthony of Padua Roman Catholic Chapel of West Orange, New Jersey. Requiem Mass for his repose was offered by the late Father Paul A. Wickens (April 14, 1930 – July 8, 2004) before being buried within the Gate of Heaven Cemetery, in Hawthorne, New York.

Family

Martin's father, Dr. Connor Martin, a gynocologist of British decent, provided free services to the IRA and he had was a judge in the Sinn Fein courts during the Irish War of Independence. His mother was Catherine Fitzmaurice-Martin, of Irish decent.[21]

The Martin family had 11 children. Malachi Martin had 3 brothers, all clerics: Rev. William (Liam) Martin C.C., Rev. Conor Martin and Rev. Francis Xavier Martin O.S.A.[22] Four sisters, Marie Therese Ferntren-Martin, Kay Doyle-Martin, Netta Kelly-Martin and Josette O'Dowd-Martin, survived him.

Fr. Liam Martin, his nephew, was private secretary to John Charles McQuaid C.S.Sp., archbishop of Dublin. [23]

He was closely related to John Edmund Fitzmaurice, former bishop of Erie, Philadelphia and Edmond John Fitzmaurice, former bishop of Wilmington, Delaware.[21]

Bibliography

Books

  • The Scribal Character of the Dead Sea Scrolls, 2 volumes, Bibliothèque du Muséon 44-45, Publications Universitaires, Louvain, 1958
  • The Pilgrim: Pope Paul VI, The Council and The Church in a time of decision, Farrar, Straus, New York, 1964 (written under the pseudonym of Michael Serafian)
  • The Encounter: Religion in Crisis, Farrar, Straus and Giroux, New York, 1969, ISBN 0374148163
  • Three Popes and the Cardinal: The Church of Pius, John and Paul in its Encounter with Human History, Farrar, Straus and Giroux , New York, 1972, ISBN 0374276757
  • Jesus Now: How Jesus has no Past, Will not come Again and in loving actions is Dissolving the Molds of Our Spent Society, E. P. Dutton, New York, 1973, ISBN 0525136754,
  • Hostage to the Devil: The Possession and Exorcism of Five Living Americans, 1st edition, Readers Digest, New York, 1976, ISBN 006065337X; 2nd edition with a new preface by the author, HarperSanFrancisco, San Francisco, 1992, ISBN 006065337X
  • The Final Conclave, Stein and Day Publishers, New York, 1978, ISBN 0812824342
  • King of Kings: a Novel of the Life of David, Simon and Schuster, New York, 1980, ISBN 0671247077
  • The Decline and Fall of the Roman Church, G. P. Putnam's Sons, New York, 1981, ISBN 0399126651
  • The New Castle; Reaching for the Ultimate, E.P. Dutton, New York, 1984, ISBN 0525165533
  • Rich Church, Poor Church: The Catholic Church and its Money, G. P. Putnam's Sons, New York, 1984, ISBN 0399129065
  • There is Still Love: Five Parables of God's Love That Will Change Your Life, Macmillan, New York, 1984, ISBN 0025804405
  • Vatican: a Novel, Harper & Row, New York, 1986, ISBN 0060154780
  • The Jesuits: The Society of Jesus and the Betrayal of the Roman Catholic Church, Simon & Schuster, New York, 1987, ISBN 0671545051
  • The Keys of This Blood: The Struggle for World Dominion between Pope John Paul II, Mikhail Gorbachev, and the Capitalist West, Simon and Schuster, New York, 1990, ISBN 0671691740
  • The Thunder of Justice: The Warning, the Miracle, the Chastisement, the Era of Peace, MaxKol Communications, Sterling, 1993 ISBN 096343070X (in collaboration with Ted Flynn and Maureen Flynn)
  • Windswept House: A Vatican Novel, Doubleday, New York, 1996, ISBN 0385484089
  • In the Murky Waters of Vatican II, MAETA, Metairie, 1997 ISBN 1889168068 (in collaboration with Atila Sinke Guimarães)
  • Fatima Priest: The Story of Father Nicolas Grüner, Gods Counsel Publishing, Pound Ridge, 1997, ISBN 0966304624 (in collaboration with Francis Alban and Christopher A. Ferrara)

Spanish, French, German, Dutch, Italian and Polish translations exist.

Articles

  • The Scientist as Shaman, in Harper's Magazine, Vol. 244, No. 1462, March 1972
  • Footsteps of Abraham, in The New York Times, March 13 1983

French translations exist.

See also

References

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 www.wnd.com
  2. www.biblio.com
  3. www.geocities.com
  4. 4.0 4.1 www.angelqueen.org
  5. www.independant.co.uk
  6. www.fatimacrusador.com
  7. www.geocities.com
  8. Janzen, Bernard, The External War: Interview with Malachi Martin (1991), Toronto, Triumph Communications, 2004, ISBN 0973214813
  9. www.guardian.co.uk
  10. Loeffler, John, The Wisdom of Malachi Martin, Radio Liberty, Soquel, March 1997
  11. Martin, Malachi, Vatican: a Novel, Harper & Row, New York, 1986, ISBN 0060154780
  12. Loeffler, John, The Wisdom of Malachi Martin, Radio Liberty, Soquel, March 1997
  13. Kennedy, William H., Occult History, 2008 page 129-157
  14. Kaiser, Robert, Clerical Error: A True Story, Continuum, ..., 2002, ISBN 0826413846, page 261
  15. Kennedy, William H; Widner SJ, Fr Tom (April), High Ranking Jesuit Confirms Malachi Martin’s Status as Life Long Priest, http://www.williamhkennedy.com/articles/highrankMM.html, retrieved 2008-11-21 
  16. Kotre, John N., The Best of Times, the Worst of Times, Nelson-Hall Company, 1979 ISBN 9780882295978
  17. books.google.be
  18. www.nytimes.com
  19. www.angelqueen.com
  20. Kennedy, William H., In Defense of Father Malachi Martin, Seattle Catholic, July 2002
  21. 21.0 21.1 www.angelqueen.org
  22. Phillips, Seymour (March 15, 2000). "Obituary: The Rev Professor F. X. Martin". Independent (London). http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qn4158/is_20000315/ai_n14282274. Retrieved 2008-11-21. 
  23. books.google.com

Printed interviews

  • Janzen, Bernard, Catholicism Overturned: Interview with Malachi Martin (1990), Toronto, Triumph Communications, 2003, ISBN 0973214805
  • Janzen, Bernard, The External War: Interview with Malachi Martin (1991), Toronto, Triumph Communications, 2004, ISBN 0973214813
  • Janzen, Bernard, The Kingdom of Darkness: Interview with Malachi Martin (199...), Toronto, Triumph Communications, 200..., ISBN ...
  • Dowbenko, Uri, Spiritual Wickedness in High Placs: Malachi Martin on The End of Religion (As We Know it), Bushwhacked: Inside Stories of True Conspiracy, National Liberty Press, Pray, 1999 ISBN 0971004218

Audio interviews

  • Janzen, Bernard, Catholicism Overturned: Interview with Malachi Martin, Toronto, Triumph Communications, 1990
  • Janzen, Bernard, The External War: Interview with Malachi Martin, Toronto, Triumph Communications, 1991
  • Janzen, Bernard, The Kingdom of Darkness: Interview with Malachi Martin, Toronto, Triumph Communications, 199...
  • Janzen, Bernard, Peter in Chains: Interview with Malachi Martin, Toronto, Triumph Communications, 199...
  • Janzen, Bernard, The Shoes of the Fishermen: Interview with Malachi Martin, Toronto, Triumph Communications, 199...
  • Janzen, Bernard, The Deserted Vineyard: Interview with Malachi Martin, Toronto, Triumph Communications, 199...
  • Janzen, Bernard, The Tempter's Hour: Interview with Malachi Martin, Toronto, Triumph Communications, 199...
  • Janzen, Bernard, Crossing The Desert: Interview with Malachi Martin, Toronto, Triumph Communications, 199...
  • Monteith, Stanley, The Wisdom of Malachi Martin, Radio Liberty, Soquel, February 26 1996
  • Monteith, Stanley, The Wisdom of Malachi Martin, Radio Liberty, Soquel, June 27 1996
  • ..., Interview with Malachi Martin, Paranet Continuum Radio, July 7 1996
  • ..., Interview with Malachi Martin, Paranet Continuum Radio, July 17 1996
  • Bell, Art, Interview with Malachi Martin, Coast to Coast AM, October 18 1996
  • Bell, Art, Interview with Malachi Martin, Coast to Coast AM, November 15 1996
  • Loeffler, John, The Wisdom of Malachi Martin, Radio Liberty, Soquel, March 1997
  • Bell, Art, Interview with Malachi Martin, Coast to Coast AM, March 3 1997
  • Bell, Art, Interview with Malachi Martin, Coast to Coast AM, April 4 1997
  • Monteith, Stanley, The Wisdom of Malachi Martin, Radio Liberty, Soquel, April 10 1997
  • Bell, Art, Interview with Malachi Martin, Coast to Coast AM, July 11 1997
  • Bell, Art, Interview with Malachi Martin, Coast to Coast AM, May 4 1998
  • Bell, Art, Interview with Malachi Martin, Coast to Coast AM, July 17 1998

Video interviews

Books and articles

  • Roddy, Joseph, How the Jews Changed Catholic Thinking, Look Magazine, January 25 1966
  • Cleary, Peter, He looked like Walter Mitty, Sunday Independent, June 3 1973
  • Kaufman, Ben L.,Jesus Now Author Not A Swashbuckler, Cincinnati Enquirer, October 26 1974
  • Kaufman, Ben L., Reader Will find New Maturity in latest Malachi Martin Book, Cincinnati Enquirer, October 26 1974
  • Brennan, Michael, Malachi Martin Is Dead at 78; Author of Books on the Church, The New York Times, July 30 1999
  • Dougherty, Jon E.,Catholic novelist Malachi Martin dies: Complications from stroke, fall cited, WorldNetDaily, July 29 1999
  • Dougherty, Jon E., Malachi Martin: Dispelling the Myths, WorldNetDaily, August 2 1999
  • Corley, Felix, Obituary: Malachi Martin, The Independent, August 6 1999
  • Galati, Eric, Malachi Martin: A renowned biblical scholar, he clashed with the hierarchy on the role of the Roman Catholic church, The Guardian, August 10 1999
  • Cuneo, Michael W., American Exorcism: Expelling Demons in the Land of Plenty, Doubleday, New York, 2001 ISBN 0385501765
  • Kaiser, Robert, Clerical Error: A True Story, Continuum, New York, 2002, ISBN 0826413846
  • Kennedy, William H. In Defense of Father Malachi Martin, Seattle Catholic, July 2002
  • Kennedy, William H., High Ranking Jesuit Confirms Malachi Martin’s Status as Life Long Priest, WilliamHKennedy, April 2004

External links

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