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List of Ottoman postal rates in Palestine

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The List of Ottoman postal rates in Palestine surveys the postal rates in effect between 1840–1918 during the Ottoman rule in Palestine. Rates not applicable in Palestine are not included.

The Imperial edict of 12 Ramasan 1256 (14 October 1840)[1] and later ordinances made the distinction between three types of mail items: ordinary letters, registered letters (markings te'ahudd olunmoshdur), and official letters (markings tahirat-i mühümme).[2] Fees were calculated by the type of mail, the weight, and the distance (measured in hours): in 1840, an ordinary letter, weighing less than 10g, had a cost per hour of 1 para.[3][4] Special fees applied to samples, insured mail, special delivery, and printed matters, etc.[3] The postal rates changed frequently, and new services were added over the years. Upon joining the Universal Postal Union on 1 July 1875, Ottoman overseas rates conformed to UPU rules.

Postal rates

Date Rate details and subsequent changes (relevant to Palestine)
October 14, 1840[3] Regular mail 1 para per 3 dirhem (ca. 9.6g) and 1 hour;

half a para increase per additional dirhem and hour

Official mail twice base rate
Printed matter & newspapers one quarter para per 5 dirhem and 1 hour
Samples 10 para per hour and okka (1282g)
Special delivery 25 kuruş base fee plus 3.5 kuruş per hour[5]
Insurance 2 para per hour per 1000 kuruş of value; special rate for silver coins: 12 para per hour per 1000 kuruş of value
January 22, 1843[3] Newspapers for a small format newspaper and up to 60 hours: 10 para; for any newspaper over 60 hours: 20 para
February 1, 1858[3] Newspapers for a local newspaper and up to 50 hours: 20 para; 51 up to 100 hours: 40 para, over 101 hours: 60 para
January 17, 1861[6] Newspapers for a daily newspaper and up to 50 hours: 2 para; 51 up to 100 hours: 4 para, over 101 hours: 6 para
September 17, 1863[6] Regular mail 1 kuruş per 3 dirhem (9.6g) and up to 50 hours; 51 up to 100 hours: 3 kuruş. For every 100 hours over the first 100 hours: 2 kuruş additional (maximum: 11 kuruş). Weight over 3 dirhem: 50% increase per dirhem.
Registration twice base rate
Official mail same as civil rate
Newspapers up to 50 hours: 10 para; 51 up to 100 hours: 20 para, over 101 hours: 30 para. Seamail: 20 para
October 3, 1868[6] Regular mail 1.5 kuruş per 3 dirhem (9.6g) and up to 100 hours; 101 up to 200 hours: 3 kuruş. More than 200 hours: 6 kuruş. Seamail: 1 kuruş
Newspapers 5 para per 5 dirhem (16g): 10 para for 5 up to 10 dirhem, over 10 dirhem: 20 para
October 31, 1871[6] Weight measure decimalized: 10g instead of 3 dirhem (9.6g)
Official mail free
1876[6] Foreign letters (UPU) 1 kuruş and 10 para per 10g; postcards (UPU): 20 para
October 15, 1882[7] Regular mail 2 kuruş per 10g; seamail: 20 para per 10g, postcards: 20 para
Foreign letters (UPU) 1 kuruş per 10g; postcards (UPU): 20 para
Postage due twice the actual rate
Printed matter & newspapers 5 para up to 15g; up to 30g: 10 para, more than 30g: 20 para. Large format: 20 para up to 85g. Seamail: 10 para per 75g
Samples 10 para up to 50g; up to 100g: 1 kuruş, 101 up to 200g: 2 kuruş, 200 up to 250g: 2 kuruş 10 para, additionally 20 para per extra 50g (maximum: 2000g)
September 6, 1888[8] Regular mail 1 kuruş per 15g
Registration 1 kuruş
Advice of receipt 1 kuruş
August 12, 1900[8] Money orders 20 paras up to 100 kuruş value; over 100 and up to 500 kuruş value: 20 paras per 100 kuruş value; over 500 and up to 2000 kuruş value: 20 paras per 200 kuruş value
Insurance 1 kuruş per per 1000 kuruş of value
June 14, 1901[8] Parcels
(sea or rail)
4 kuruş per 5kg (using one sea or railway line); using two sea or railway lines: 8 kuruş per 5 kg; using three or more sea or railway lines: 10 kuruş per 5 kg
Parcels
(land)
20 kuruş per 5kg (within same province); to adjacent province: 35 kuruş per 5 kg; to province removed by one province: 50 kuruş per 5 kg; to province removed by two provinces: 65 kuruş per 5 kg; to province removed by more than two provinces: 80 kuruş per 5 kg
Int. parcels 11 kuruş per 5 kg
October 13, 1903[8] festive postcards[9] up to 30g: 5 para per five words; up to 50g: 10 para
July 26, 1913[8] postal cheques 20 para for up tp 10 kuruş value
July 8, 1915[8] war orphan tax 10 para per letter; 20 para per registered letter; 5 kuruş per telegram, 1 kuruş per insured item

Currency:

See also

References and sources

Notes
  1. Collins & Steichele, 2000, pp. 17-21.
  2. Steichele, 1977-1981, p. 1015.3
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 Collins & Steichele, 2000, p. 13.
  4. Steichele, 1977-1981, p. 1015.4.
  5. Corroboration needed as 25 kuruş = 1000 para
  6. 6.0 6.1 6.2 6.3 6.4 Collins & Steichele, 2000, p. 14, quoting an Erkan Esmer article in "Tughra Times", October 1995, as source of original research.
  7. Collins & Steichele, 2000, pp. 14-15, quoting an Erkan Esmer article in "Tughra Times", October 1995, as source of original research.
  8. 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.5 Collins & Steichele, 2000, p. 15, quoting an Erkan Esmer article in "Tughra Times", October 1995, as source of original research.
  9. postcards sent for religious or national festivities
Sources
  • Collins, Norman J. and Anton Steichele (2000). The Ottoman post and telegraph offices in Palestine and Sinai. London: Sahara. ISBN 1903022061.
  • Steichele, Anton (1990/1991). The foreign post offices in Palestine : 1840–1918. 2 vols. Chicago: World Philatelic Congress of Israel, Holy Land, and Judaica Societies.

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