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Learn Salok Mahala 9

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Learn Salok Mahala 9 Gnome-speakernotes      Play Audio Next page
Page 1426

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Page 1426



The above menu allows you to select each page of this important Sikh holy Bani. Salok Mahala 9 are the saloks (short hymns) by the ninth Sikh Guru, Guru Tegh Bahadur which form the concluding portion of the Guru Granth Sahib. They precede Guru Arjan's Mundavani and appear from page 1426 to 1429 of the Sikh holy Granth.

File:Salok mahala 9ps.jpg


This composition consists of 57 (Fifty Seven) saloks and consists just 4 pages of Gurbani. Each salok is a couplet consisting of 2 lines. This Bani was incorporated into the Guru Granth Sahib by Guru Gobind Singh, the last human Guru of the Sikhs. As is commonly believed, they were composed by Guru Teg Bahadur while in the 'Kotwali' (prison) at Chandni Chowk, Delhi, before he achieved martyrdom.

You can read this Gurbani in Original Gurmukhi text, Roman/English text with English translation. Also by clicking on Play Audio at the top of the screen, you can listen to the Gurbani in Gurmukhi/Punjabi.

Choose from one of the following 4 options:

  • 1 to 4 represents the 4 pages in the Guru Granth Sahib from page number 1426 to 1429.
  • Start reading and listening to this Bani now by clicking on 1 on the above Menu and then click on Play Audio.

Salok, in Sanskrit, signifies a verse of laudation or praise. In Hindi and Punjabi, it has come to imply a couplet with a moral or devotional content. Its metrical form is the same as that of a doha or dohira, a rhymed couplet. Whether the slokas were written during the days just before Guru Tegh Bahadur`s execution or earlier in his career as some say, their mood is certainly in consonance with the crisis of that time, when the Guru confronted the imperial might of the last Mughal emperor, Aurangzeb, to defend the freedom of religion and worship in India and gave his life for a cause which to him meant true commitment to God.

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