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Genealogies of Genesis

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Biblical longevity
Name Age LXX
Methuselah 969 969
Jared 962 962
Noah 950 950
Adam 930 930
Seth 912 912
Kenan 910 910
Enos 905 905
Mahalalel 895 895
Lamech 777 753
Shem 600 600
Eber 464 404
Cainan 460
Arpachshad 438 465
Salah 433 466
Enoch 365 365
Peleg 239 339
Reu 239 339
Serug 230 330
Job 210? 210?
Terah 205 205
Isaac 180 180
Abraham 175 175
Nahor 148 304
Jacob 147 147
Esau 147? 147?
Ishmael 137 137
Levi 137 137
Amram 137 137
Kohath 133 133
Laban 130+ 130+
Deborah 130+ 130+
Sarah 127 127
Miriam 125+ 125+
Aaron 123 123
Rebecca 120+ 120+
Moses 120 120
Joseph 110 110
Joshua 110 110

The genealogies of Genesis record the descendants of Adam and Eve as given in the first book of the Bible, Genesis. The enumerated genealogy in chapters 4, 5 and 11 reports the lineal male descent to Abraham, including the age at which each patriarch fathered his named son and the number of years he lived thereafter. The genealogy for Cain is given in Chapter 4 and the genealogy for Seth is in Chapter 5. (Genesis chapter 10, the Table of Nations recording the peopling of the Earth by Noah's descendants, is not stricty a genealogy but an ethnography).

Enumerated genealogyEdit

Three versions of the Genesis genealogy exist: the Hebrew Masoretic Text, the Greek Septuagint, and the Hebrew Samaritan Pentateuch. Translations from the Masoretic Text are preferred by Western Christians, including Roman Catholics and Protestants and by followers of Orthodox Judaism, whereas the Greek version is preferred by Eastern Christians, including Eastern Orthodox, Coptic, Ethiopic, Jacobite, and Armenian. The Samaritan version of the Pentateuch is used mainly by the Samaritans. The Vulgate, published by Jerome in 405, is a Latin translation based on a Hebrew Tanakh compiled near the end of the first century, whereas the Septuagint was reportedly written by seventy translators in Egypt near the middle of the third century BC based on an earlier version of the Tanakh. Both of these translations have, like the Masoretic Text, been the basis for translations into numerous vernacular languages.

The Genesis genealogy, along with other biblical and secular events, was used to fix the Creation of the world. But the patriarchs were often 100 years older at the birth of their named son in the Septuagint than they were in the Vulgate, resulting in an Eastern Creation 1466 years earlier than the Western Creation. The calculation most famous in the English-speaking world is that of Archbishop James Ussher, 4004 BC, whereas the most famous Eastern calculations is the epoch of the Byzantine Era, 5509 BC.

The following table lists the patriarchs that appear in the Vulgate and the Septuagint, but their names are spelled as they appear in the King James Version of the Bible. Their year of birth differs according to the Vulgate or the Septuagint. (AM = Anno Mundi = in the year of the world). Also given is each patriarch's age at the birth of his named son and the age of the patriarch's death. Cainan, born after the flood is mentioned in the Septuagint but not the Vulgate. Methuselah survived the Flood according to the Septuagint (but not the Vulgate), even though he was not on Noah's Ark.

  Vulgate Septuagint  
Patriarch Birth Son Death Birth Son Death Wife/Wives/etc
Adam AM 1 130 930 AM 1 230 930 Eve
Seth 130 105 912 230 205 912 Azura¹
Enos or Enosh 235 90 905 435 190 905 Noam¹
Cainan or Kenan 325 70 910 625 170 910 Mualaleth¹
Mahalaleel 395 65 895 795 165 895 Dinah¹
Jared 460 162 962 960 162 962 Baraka¹
Enoch 622 65 365² 1122 165 365² Edna¹
Methuselah 687 187 969 1287 167 969 Edna¹
Lamech 874 182 777 1454 188 753 Betenos¹
Noah 1056 500 950 1642 500 950 Emzara¹
Shem 1556 100 600 2142 100 600 Sedeqetelebab¹
Flood 1656 2242  
Arphaxad 1656 35 438 2242 135 535 Rasueja¹
Cainan 2377 130 460 Melka¹
Salah 1691 30 433 2507 130 460 Muak¹
Eber 1721 34 464 2637 134 404 Azurad¹
Peleg 1755 30 239 2771 130 339 Lomna¹
Reu 1785 32 239 2901 132 339 Ora¹
Serug 1817 30 230 3033 130 330 Melka¹
Nahor 1847 29 148 3163 179 304 Ijaska¹
Terah 1876 70 205 3342 70 275+ Edna¹
Abraham 1946 100 175 3412 Sarai; (Hagar); Keturah
Isaac 2046 60 180 xxxx Rebekah
Jacob 2106 xxxx Rachel; Leah; (Bilhah); (Zilpah)

¹: The names of these wives are recorded in the Book of Jubilees, not Genesis. The names of the other wives are recorded in both.
²: According to most interpretations, including the New Testament Epistle to the Hebrews, Enoch did not die,[1] but was taken away by God (at an age of 365). Genesis states that Enoch "walked with God; and he was not; for God took him."[2]

Genealogies of Cain and SethEdit

Three of Adam and Eve's children are named. The main genealogy is via Seth, who was born after Cain, the firstborn son, slew his brother Abel. A genealogy for Cain is also given (in genesis 4), with some names similar to those for Seth's descendants. No years are provided, so the following table simply lines the descendants up by generation.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Adam
 
Eve
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Cain
 
 
 
Abel
 
 
 
Seth
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Enoch
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Enos(Enosh)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Irad
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Cainan(Kenan)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Mehujael
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Mahalaleel
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Methushael
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Jared
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Adah
 
Lamech
 
 
 
Zillah
 
 
 
Enoch
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Jabal
 
Jubal
 
Tubal-Cain
 
Naamah
 
Methuselah
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Lamech
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Noah
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Shem
 
Ham
 
Japheth

(for a continuation of this family tree through the line of Shem, see Abraham's Family Tree)

Although Cain's line is taken no further, one possible implication is that it continues beyond that by suggesting that the terminal sons were the ancestors of those who practice various trades. In Genesis 4, Cain's line also provides the names of Lamech's two wives, Adah and Zillah. Jabal and Jubal were the sons of Adah. Jabal was the father of nomads and Jubal of musicians. Tubal-Cain was the son of Zillah and the father of blacksmiths. A daughter of Zillah, Naamah, is also mentioned. An analysis of the relationship between the lines of descent, of Cain and of Seth, reveals that inter-marriage may have taken place between the descendants of Cain and Seth. For example, Lamech's daughter Naamah married her patrilineal parallel cousin Methuselah, and named her first-born son Lamech, after her father. A definite implication is that these various trades were flourishing prior to the Flood. Therefore, cultures of nomads, musicians and metal workers would have been destroyed by the Flood.

HistoricityEdit

The importance of the genealogies (toledot. "generations") emphasized by Ezra's insistence on racial purity of the High Priest resulted in genealogical scrolls being kept in Jerusalem. They are mentioned by Josephus, and their loss in AD 70 was considered disastrous. A priest was required to demonstrate the purity of the pedigree of his prospective bride as far back as her great-great-grandfather and great-great-grandmother. In the case of marriage with a daughter of Levi or of Israel his scrutiny had to extend a degree further, perhaps a sign that more relaxed attitudes toward marrying non-Jews had prevailed in the northern kingdom. The Pharisees emphasized the nobility of learning as opposed to the priestly-caste nobility insisted upon by the Sadducees.

Literal interpreters believe the genealogies as recorded in Genesis were assuredly intended not as myth, but as history: the matter-of-fact style of writing, the degree of detail, and the fact that ages are given for when fathers had sons and when they died, are all presented as history by the writers of Genesis. The New Testament authors of Matthew (1:1–17˄) and Luke (3:23–38˄) also took the traditional genealogies as history and applied them in tracking Jesus' ancestry back to Abraham and Adam respectively.

In the beginning of the twentieth century, academic opinion regarding the historicity of the genealogies split. For example:

It is thus evident that the Table of Nations contains no scientific classification of the races of mankind. Not only this, however, it also offers no historically true account of the origin of the races of mankind." (Driver 114).

The so-called Table of Nations remains, according to all results of monumental explorations, an ethnographic original document of the first rank which nothing can replace." (Kautzsch 234).

In the early twentieth century, some anthropologists[who?] determined that ethnicity is a construct, as argued by Herodotus, and that the genealogies of Genesis were primitive efforts towards creating an ethnology that would express the degrees of alienness or relatedness the authors of such genealogies sensed among those neighboring peoples of whom they were aware. For instance:

The object of this Table is partly to show how the Hebrews supposed the principle nations known to them to be related to each other, partly to assign Israel, in particular, its place among them.

The names are in no case to be taken as those of real individuals.

The real origin of the nations enumerated here, belonging in many cases to entirely different racial types — Semites, Aryans, Hittites, Egyptians — must have reached back into remote prehistoric ages from which we may be sure not even the dimmest recollections could have been preserved at the time when the chapter was written. The nations and tribes existed: and imaginary ancestors were afterwards postulated for the purpose of exhibiting pictorially the relationship in which they were supposed to stand towards one another.

An exactly parallel instance, though not so fully worked out, is afforded by the ancient Greeks. The general name of the Greeks was Hellenes, the principle sub-divisions were the Dorians, the Aeolians, the Ionians, and the Achaeans; and accordingly the Greeks traced their descent from a supposed eponymous ancestor Hellen, who had three sons, Dorus and Aeolus, the supposed ancestors of the Dorians and Aeolians, and Xuthus, from whose two sons, Ion and Achaeus, the Ionians and Achaeans were respectively supposed to be descended. (Driver 112).

Anthropologists of this vein[who?] assert that some genealogies in the flood myth of Greek mythology are analogous to those in Genesis: in them, Hellen, the son of Deucalion, the Greek Noah, and eponym of the Hellenes had three sons, named Dorus and Æolus, the ancestors of the Dorians and Aeolians, and Xuthus, whose sons Achæus and Ion, were the progenitors of the Achæans and Ionians. In Ancient Perceptions of Greek Ethnicity (Malkin 2001), the subject is shifting Hellenic perceptions of ethnicity, but the discourse throws light on motivations for the genealogies of Genesis.

Arguments are also made that comparisons may also be made with the Welsh folk genealogies that trace their king-lines back to Troy.

Other scholars,[who?] however, continue to hold that the Table of Nations is the most historically accurate account of early human history available, and reject the above analysis, arguing that "Since, as we shall see, the Table certainly does not on its face bear any evidence of being written for propaganda purposes, Driver appears to be reading more into the record than is justified. It is rather like setting up a straw man in order to be able to demolish him with scholarly verbosity." They note that Genesis is unique among ancient genealogies in its historical and objective style. For instance:

Egyptians and Phoenicians, Assyrians and Babylonians, even Indians and Persians, had a certain measure of geographical and ethnological knowledge, before more strictly scientific investigation had been begun among the classical peoples. From several of these, such as the Egyptians, Assyrians, Babylonians, and Persians, surveys of enumerations of the peoples known to them and attempts at maps have come down to us in the written memorials they have left behind. But not much attention was paid, as a rule, to foreigners unless national and trade interests were at stake. Often enough they were despised as mere barbarians, and in no case were they included with the more cultured nations in a higher unity.

It is otherwise in our text. Here many with whom the Israelites had no sort of actual relationship are taken into consideration." (Dillmann 314).

Scholars also note the text's remarkably neutral tone, arguing:

Had this Table been designed for propaganda purposes (to establish Israel's position as of equal dignity though not sharing some of the glories of the surrounding peoples) or had it been merely the work of some early historian creating his own data with a comparatively free hand, then almost certainly some device would have been adopted for deliberately setting forth not only the high status of his own ancestors, but the very low status of that of his enemies. With respect to the first tendency, one has only to read modern history books to discern how very easily individuals of little real significance can be presented to us in such a way as to make us take enormous pride in our heritage. There is, in fact, very little written history which is not in part propaganda, although the author himself is often unaware of it. The number of "firsts" claimed by some national historians for their countrymen is quite amazing, and it is usually clear what the nationality of the author himself is. In complete contrast, it would be difficult to prove with certainty of what nationality the author of Genesis 10 was. We assume he was a Hebrew, but if the amount of attention given to any particular line that is traced were used as a clue to his identity, he might have been a Japhethite, a Canaanite, or even an Arab. (Custance, Ch. 1)

The issue of the purpose of the historicity of the genealogies therefore remains a subject of dispute among biblical scholars.

Genesis 5 numbersEdit

See also Codex_Alexandrinus and Codex_Vaticanus
genesis 5
genesis 11

Nearly all modern translations of Genesis are derived from the Masoretic (Hebrew) Text. But there are also two other versions of Genesis: the Samaritan (in an early Hebrew script) and the Septuagint (a Greek translation of an early Hebrew text). Although, scholars are aware that these three versions of genesis 5 have different numbers, people who have seen only the commonly available translations are often unaware that other versions exist. The numbers in the Masoretic, Samaritan, and Lucianic Septuagint versions of Genesis 5 are shown in this table:[3]


The following table lists the patriarchs that appear in the Vulgate and the Septuagint, but their names are spelled as they appear in the King James Version of the Bible. Their year of birth differs according to the Vulgate or the Septuagint. (AM = Anno Mundi = in the year of the world). Also given is each patriarch's age at the birth of his named son and the age of the patriarch's death. Cainan, born after the flood is mentioned in the Septuagint but not the Vulgate. Methuselah survived the Flood according to the Septuagint (but not the Vulgate), even though he was not on Noah's Ark.

Nearly all modern translations of Genesis are derived from the Masoretic (Hebrew) Text. But there are also two other versions of Genesis: the Samaritan (in an early Hebrew script) and the Septuagint (a Greek translation of an early Hebrew text). Although, scholars are aware that these three versions of genesis 5 have different numbers, people who have seen only the commonly available translations are often unaware that other versions exist. The numbers in the Masoretic, Samaritan, and Lucianic Septuagint versions of Genesis 5 are shown in this table:[4]

    Masoretic & Vulgate   Samaritan   Septuagint    
Patriarch Meaning Birth Son remain Death Birth Son remain Death Birth Son remain Death Wife/Wives/etc
Adam man 0 130 800 930 0 130 800 930 0 230 700 930 Eve
Seth Appointed 130 105 807 912 130 105 807 912 230 205 707 912 Azura¹
Enosh Mortal 235 90 815 905 235 90 815 905 435 190 715 905 Noam¹
Kenan Sorrow 325 70 840 910 325 70 840 910 625 170 740 910 Mualaleth¹
Mahalalel The Blessed God 395 65 830 895 395 65 830 895 795 165 730 895 Dinah¹
Jared Shall come down 460 162 800 962 460 62 785 847 960 162 800 962 Baraka¹
Enoch Teaching 622 65 300 365² 522 65 300 365² 1122 165 200 365² Edna¹
Methuselah His death shall bring 687 187 782 969 587 67 653 720 1287 167 802 969 Edna¹
Lamech The Despairing 874 182 595 777 654 53 600 653 1454 188 565 753 Betenos¹
Noah Rest, or comfort 1056 500  — 950 707 500  —  — 1642 500  — 950 Emzara¹
Shem name/there 1556 100 500 600 1207 100 500 600 2142 100 335 435 Sedeqetelebab¹
Arphaxad I shall fail as the breast 1656 35 403 438 1307 135 330 465 2242 135 330 465 Rasueja¹
Cainan their smith  —  —  —  — 1442 130 330 460 2377 130 330 460 Melka¹
Salah sprout 1691 30 403 433 1572 130 330 460 2507 130 330 460 Muak¹
Eber the region beyond 1721 34 430 464 1702 134 370 504 2637 134 370 504 Azurad¹
Peleg division 1755 30 209 239 1836 130 209 339 2771 130 209 339 Lomna¹
Reu friend 1785 32 207 239 1966 132 207 339 2901 132 207 339 Ora¹
Serug branch 1817 30 200 230 2098 130 200 330 3033 130 200 330 Melka¹
Nahor snorting 1847 29 119 148 2228 79 129 208 3163 79 129 208 Ijaska¹
Terah station 1876 70  — 205 2307 70 205 275 3342 70 205+ 275+ Edna¹
Abram exalted father 1946 100  — 175 2377  —  —  — 3412 100  — 175 Sarai; (Hagar); Keturah

¹: The names of these wives are recorded in the Book of Jubilees, not Genesis. The names of the other wives are recorded in both.
²: According to most interpretations, including the New Testament Epistle to the Hebrews, Enoch did not die,[5] but was taken away by God (at an age of 365). Genesis states that Enoch "walked with God; and he was not; for God took him."[6]


Number differencesEdit

A comparison of the numbers in the above table shows that the ages when the sons were born plus the remainders equal the totals given in each version, but each version uses different numbers to arrive at these totals. The three versions agree on some of the total ages at death, but many of the other numbers differ by exactly 100. The Septuagint numbers for the ages of the fathers at the birth of their sons, are in many instances 100 greater than the corresponding numbers in the other two versions.

The Samaritan chronology has Jared and Methuselah dying in Noah's 600th year, the year of the flood. The Masoretic chronology also has Methuselah dying in Noah’s 600th year, but the Masoretic version uses a different chronology than the Samaritan version. The Lucianic Septuagint chronology has Methuselah surviving the flood and therefore the 100 year differences were not an attempt by the Septuagint editors to have Jared, Methuselah, or Lamech die during or prior to the flood.[7] Some scholars[8] argue that the differences between the Masoretic and Septuagint chronologies in Genesis 5 can be explained as alterations designed to rationalize a primary Masoretic system of chronology to a later Septuagint system. According to another scholar,[9] to assume that the Masoretic Text is primary "is a mere convention for the scholarly world" and "it should not be postulated in advance that MT reflects the original text of the biblical books better than the other texts."

Some scholars declare the Genesis 5 numbers to be "fictive"[10] because attempts to rationalize the numbers by translating "years" as "months" results in some of the Genesis 5 people fathering children when they were 5 years old if the Masoretic chronology is assumed to be primary. Commentators who take the Genesis 5 birth ages at face value, fail to explain how Methuselah could father a son at the age of 187.

The scholarly translation of the Hebrew Pentateuch into Greek at Alexandria, Egypt in about 280 BC worked off a Hebrew text that was edited in the 5th and 4th centuries BC.[11] This would be centuries older than the proto–Masoretic Text selected as the official text by the Masoretes.[12]

If the Genesis 5 numbers represent hundreds of solar years, this creates two problems: men do not live over nine hundred years and do not father children when they are over a century old.

One commentator[13] argued that the Septuagint Genesis 5 numbers are comparable to ages of moden people if decimal points are inserted in the numbers, which "will explain how it was that they read 930 years for the age of Adam instead of 93 years, and so 969 years for Methuselah instead of 96 years, and 956 years for that of Noah instead of 95 years", and Noah at 500 years instead of 50 years. Table III [14] lists "Enoch ... 16.5" instead of 165, and "Lamech ... 75.3" instead of 753. Another commentator[15] provided a similar table of the same Septuagint Genesis 5 numbers with decimal points inserted in the same locations.

Beyond GenesisEdit

Notable sons of Jacob (aka Israel).

Name Birth Comments Wife/Wives/etc
Joseph xxxx Counted among first 70 men of Jacob's lineage to be in Egypt. Asenath
Judah xxxx Among 70 men to leave Canaan for Egypt with Jacob. Bloodline goes to Jesus (eg Perez). daughter of Shea; (Tamar)

Following Judah's line

Name examples of children example references Comments Wife/Wives/etc
Perez Hezron; Hamal Gen 46, Num 26.22 Among 70 men to leave Canaan for Egypt with Jacob
Hezron Ram Gen 46 Among 70 men to leave Canaan for Egypt with Jacob? Or born in Egypt? Israel population = 70 men in three generations from Jacob, or many many more if inclusive of all descendants of Eber?
Ram Amminadab Living in Egypt
Amminadab Nahshon, Elisheva Aaron's father in law
Nahshon Salmon Num 1.7 At least 20 years old at beginning of 40 year Exodus. Died during 40 year Exodus. Israel's population is 603,550 men by Num 1.46? (see discussion in The Exodus for paradox encountered in three generation population growth)
Salmon Boaz Born during 40 Year Exodus. Crossed Jordan. Moses dies at age 120 prior to crossing. Salmon is first in tribal lineage to cross? Rahab of Jericho
Boaz Obed Josh, Ruth Born during 40 Year Exodus? Or born after the crossing? Ruth
Obed Jesse
Jesse David Contemporary of King Saul?

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Hall, Jonathan, Ethnic Identity in Greek Antiquity Cambridge U.Press, 1997.
  • Malkin, Irad, editor, Ancient Perceptions of Greek Ethnicity in series Center for Hellenic Studies Colloquia, 5. Harvard University Press, 2001. Reviewed by Margaret C. Miller in Bryn Mawr Classical Review, 2002
  • Driver, S. R., The Book of Genesis, Westminster Commentaries, 3rd edition, London, UK, Methuen, 1904.
  • Kautzsch, E. F.: quoted by James Orr, "The Early Narratives of Genesis," in The Fundamentals, Vol. 1, Los Angeles, CA, Biola Press, 1917.
  • Dillmann, A., Genesis: Critically and Exegetically Expounded, Vol. 1, Edinburgh, UK, T. and T. Clark, 1897, 314.
  • Custance, Arthur C., The Roots of the Nations.[1]
  • Schmandt-Besserat, Denise, How Writing Came About, University of Texas Press, 1996, ISBN 0-292-77704-3.

NotesEdit

  1. Hebrews 11:5, King James Version.
  2. Genesis 5:24, King James Version.
  3. John Skinner, A Critical and Exegetical Commentary on Genesis, T&T Clark, Endinburgh (1930), p. 134.
  4. John Skinner, A Critical and Exegetical Commentary on Genesis, T&T Clark, Endinburgh (1930), p. 134.
  5. Hebrews 11:5, King James Version.
  6. Genesis 5:24, King James Version.
  7. Ralph W. Klein, "Archaic Chronologies and the Textual History of the Old Testament", Harvard Theol Review, 67 (1974), pp. 255-263.
  8. Gerhard Larsson, "The Chronology of the Pentateuch: A Comparison of the MT and LXX", Journal of Biblical Literature, 102 (1983), pp. 401-409.
  9. Emanual Tov, Textual Criticism of the Hebrew Bible, (Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 1992), pp. 11, 352.
  10. Joseph Blenkinsopp, The Pentateuch, Doubleday (1992), p. 74, ISBN 0-385-41207-X.
  11. Charles M. Laymon (editor), The Interpreter's One-Volume Commentary on the Bible, Abingdon Press, Nashville (1971), p. 1227.
  12. Emanuel Tov, Textual Criticism of the Hebrew Bible (1992), pp. 11, 352.
  13. Ellen H. Bennett, Science of Knowledge and Reason, 1897, London, England, pages 32-34
  14. Ellen H. Bennett, page 34
  15. Robert M. Best, Noah's Ark and the Ziusudra Epic, 1999, page 108

External linksEdit


Some or all of this article is forked from Wikipedia. The original article was at Genealogies of Genesis. The list of authors can be seen in the page history.

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