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Diocesan bishop

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This article forms part of the series
Clergy (Christian)
Russian Orthodox Episcopal Ordination
Major orders
Bishop - Priest - Deacon
Minor orders
Subdeacon - Reader
Cantor - Acolyte
Other orders
Chorepiscopos - Exorcist
Doorkeeper - Deaconess
Episcopal titles
Pope - Patriarch - Cardinal - Catholicos
Archbishop - Metropolitan
Auxiliary bishop -

Chorbishop - Titular bishop
Major Archbishop

Priestly titles
Archimandrite - Protopresbyter
Archpriest - Protosyngellos
Economos
Diaconal titles
Archdeacon - Protodeacon - Hierodeacon
Minor titles
Lampadarios
Monastic titles
Abbot - Igumen
Related
Ordination - Vestments
Presbeia - Honorifics
Clergy awards - Exarch
Proistamenos - Vicar


In general

A diocesan bishop — in general (i.e., in various religious denominations) — is a bishop in charge of a diocese. These are to be distinguished from suffragan bishops, assistant bishops, coadjutor bishops, auxiliary bishops, metropolitans, and primates.

Roman Catholic Church

See also: Catholic Church hierarchy#Diocesan bishops and Bishop (Catholic Church)#Diocesan Bishops or Eparchs

Diocesan bishop

A "diocesan bishop" [1] — in the Catholic Church — is entrusted with the care of a local Church (diocese).[2] He is responsible for teaching, governing, and sanctifying the faithful of his diocese, sharing these duties with the priests and deacons who serve under him.[3]

Coadjutor bishop

The Holy See can appoint a coadjutor bishop[4] for a diocese. He has special faculties and the right of succession.

Auxiliary bishop

The diocesan bishop may request that the Holy See appoint one or more auxiliary bishops, to assist him in his duties.[5]

Bishop emeritus

When a diocesan bishop or auxiliary bishop retires, the word "emeritus" is added to his former title, i.e., "Archbishop Emeritus of ...", "Bishop Emeritus of ...", or "Auxiliary Bishop Emeritus of ..." An example in usage would be: "Bishop John Jones, Bishop Emeritus of the Diocese of Anytown". For a cardinal, it would be: "Cardinal James Smith, Archbishop Emeritus of the Archdiocese of Anycity". The term "Bishop Emeritus" of a particular see can apply to several people, if the first lives long enough. The sees listed in the 2007 Annuario Pontificio as having more than one (Arch)Bishop Emeritus included Zárate-Campana, Villavicencio, Versailles, and Uruguaiana. There were even three Archbishops Emeriti of Taipei.

Footnotes

  1. "Canon 376". 1983 Code of Canon Law. Libreria Editrice Vaticana. http://www.vatican.va/archive/ENG1104/__P1D.HTM. Retrieved 27 July 2009. 
  2. "Canon 369". 1983 Code of Canon Law. Libreria Editrice Vaticana. http://www.vatican.va/archive/ENG1104/__P1D.HTM. Retrieved 27 July 2009. 
  3. "Canon 381". 1983 Code of Canon Law. Libreria Editrice Vaticana. http://www.vatican.va/archive/ENG1104/__P1D.HTM. Retrieved 27 July 2009. 
  4. "Canon 403 §3". 1983 Code of Canon Law. Libreria Editrice Vaticana. http://www.vatican.va/archive/ENG1104/__P1D.HTM. Retrieved 27 July 2009. 
  5. "Canon 403 §1". 1983 Code of Canon Law. Libreria Editrice Vaticana. http://www.vatican.va/archive/ENG1104/__P1D.HTM. Retrieved 27 July 2009. 


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