Wikia

Religion Wiki

Desmond Tutu

Talk1
33,799pages on
this wiki
The Most Reverend
 Desmond Tutu
Archbishop Emeritus of Cape Town
Tutu.jpg
Province Anglican Church of Southern Africa
See Cape Town (retired)
Enthroned 1986
Reign ended 1996
Predecessor Philip Welsford Richmond Russell
Successor Njongonkulu Ndungane
Ordination 1960 as Priest
Other Bishop of Lesotho
Bishop of Johannesburg
Archbishop of Cape Town
Personal details
Born 7 October 1931 (1931-10-07) (age 82)
Klerksdorp, Transvaal, South Africa
Part of the series on
Desmond Tutu
31607 tutu desmond
The Most Reverend Desmond Tutu
Early Life
Tutu's role during apartheid
Tutu's role since apartheid
Role in South Africa
Chairman of the Elders
Role in the Third World
Israel
China
United Nations Role
Political Views
Other Humanitarian Initiatives
Academic role
One Young World
Honours
Media/film appearances
Writings
Video
Article discussion

Desmond Mpilo Tutu (born 7 October 1931) is a South African cleric and activist who rose to worldwide fame during the 1980s as an opponent of apartheid. In 1984, Tutu became the second South African to be awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. Tutu was the first black South African Anglican Archbishop of Cape Town, South Africa, and primate of the Church of the Province of Southern Africa (now the Anglican Church of Southern Africa). Tutu chaired the Truth and Reconciliation Commission and is currently the chairman of The Elders. Tutu is vocal in his defence of human rights and uses his high profile to campaign for the oppressed. Tutu also campaigns to fight AIDS, tuberculosis, homophobia, poverty and racism. He received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1984, the Albert Schweitzer Prize for Humanitarianism, the Gandhi Peace Prize in 2005[1] and the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2009. Tutu has also compiled several books of his speeches and sayings.


NotesEdit

Further readingEdit

  • Shirley du Boulay, Tutu: Voice of the Voiceless (Eerdmans, 1988).
  • Michael J. Battle, Reconciliation: The Ubuntu Theology of Desmond Tutu (Pilgrim Press, 1997).
  • Steven D. Gish, Desmond Tutu: A Biography (Greenwood, 2004).
  • David Hein, "Bishop Tutu's Christology." Cross Currents 34 (1984): 492-99.
  • David Hein, "Religion and Politics in South Africa." Modern Age 31 (1987): 21-30.
  • John Allen, Rabble-Rouser for Peace: The Authorised Biography of Desmond Tutu (Rider Books, 2007).

External linksEdit


Preceded by
Philip Welsford Richmond Russell
Anglican Archbishop of Cape Town
1986-1996
Succeeded by
Njongonkulu Ndungane

Around Wikia's network

Random Wiki