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Dadivank Monastery

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Dadivank
Դադիվանք
Dadil.jpg

Dadivank Monastery

Basic information
Location Nagorno-Karabakh Republic Shahumian Region, Nagorno-Karabakh Republic
Geographic coordinates 40°09′41″N 46°17′17″E / 40.161391°N 46.288013°E / 40.161391; 46.288013Coordinates: 40°09′41″N 46°17′17″E / 40.161391°N 46.288013°E / 40.161391; 46.288013
Affiliation Armenian Apostolic Church
Architectural description
Architect(s) yes
Architectural type Monastery, Church
Architectural style Armenian
Year completed 9th-13th centuries
Specifications
NKR locator
Set01-church1.svg
Shown within Nagorno-Karabakh Republic

Dadivank Monastery (Armenian: Դադիվանք) also Khutavank (Armenian: Խութավանք - Monastery on the Hill) is an Armenian Monastery in the Shahumian Region of the Nagorno-Karabakh Republic. It was built between the 9th and 13th century.

The monastery was founded by St. Dadi who was the disciple of Thaddeus the Apostle who spread Christianity in Eastern Armenia during the first century A.C. In June, 2007, the grave of St. Dadi was discovered under the holy altar of the main church.[1] [2]

The monastic complex of Dadivank consists of the Cathedral church of St. Astvadzadzin (with Armenian writings on the wall), the chapel and other ancillary areas. The monastery was first mentioned in the 9th century. In 1994 the monastery was reopened and the reconstruction process continues up to day. The Monastery belongs to Artsakh Diocese of the Holy Armenian Apostolic Church.

The restoration began in August 2004 and was completed in 2005. The works of restoration was sponsored by Armenian-American businessman Edil Hovnanian. During the year the restoration of the Katoghike (the main domed church of the complex) was accomplished. The chapel (built in 13th century) of Dadivank Complex is a rare specimen of architecture. It was restored by Edik Abrahamian (Teheran, Iran).[3]

See also

References

External links

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