Fandom

Religion Wiki

Country Joe McDonald

34,278pages on
this wiki
Add New Page
Talk0 Share

Ad blocker interference detected!


Wikia is a free-to-use site that makes money from advertising. We have a modified experience for viewers using ad blockers

Wikia is not accessible if you’ve made further modifications. Remove the custom ad blocker rule(s) and the page will load as expected.

Country Joe McDonald (born Joseph Allen McDonald; January 1, 1942) is a Jewish American musician. He was the lead singer of the 1960s psychedelic rock group Country Joe & the Fish.[1]

Personal life

McDonald was born in Washington, D.C. He started his career busking on Berkeley, California's famous Telegraph Avenue in the early 1960s.[1] His father, Worden McDonald, was of Scottish Presbyterian heritage, and his mother, the late Florence Plotnick (McDonald), was the daughter of Russian Jewish immigrants, and served for many years on the Berkeley city council. Both of his parents were active in progressive politics. As of 2009, Country Joe still lives in Berkeley, California. McDonald's daughter, Seven, is a columnist for the LA Weekly. He has four other children, Devin, Tara, Ryan, and Emily.

Career

Country Joe has recorded 33 albums and has written hundreds of songs over a career spanning forty years. He and Barry Melton co-founded Country Joe & the Fish which became a pioneer psychedelic rock band with their eclectic performances at The Avalon Ballroom, The Fillmore, Monterey Pop Festival and both the original and the reunion Woodstock Festivals.

Their best-know is his "The "Fish" Cheer/I-Feel-Like-I'm-Fixin'-To-Die Rag," a black comedy novelty song about the Vietnam War, whose familiar chorus ("One, two, three, what are we fighting for?") is well known to the Woodstock generation and Vietnam Veterans of the 1960s and 1970s. He is also known for "The Fish Cheer" which was a cheerleader-style call-and-response with the audience where Joe spelled out "fish" ("Give me an F!").

The cheer was on the original recording of the I-Feel-Like-Like-I’m-Fixin’-To-Die, being played right before the song on the LP of the same name. The cheer became popular and the crowd would spell out F-I-S-H when the band performed live. During the summer of 1968 the band played on the Schaefer Music Festival tour.[2] Gary "Chicken" Hirsh suggested before one of the shows to spell the word “f***” instead of “fish.” Although the crowd loved it, the management of the Schaefer Beer Festival did not and kicked the band off the tour for life. The Ed Sullivan Show then canceled a previously scheduled appearance by Country Joe and the Fish and told the band to keep the money they had already been paid in exchange for never playing on the show.[2] The change of the cheer from “fish” to “f***” would continue at most of the band's live shows throughout the years, including Woodstock and the Isle of Wight Festival.

In 2003 McDonald was sued for copyright infringement over his signature song, specifically the "One, two, three, what are we fighting for?" chorus part, as derived from the 1926 early jazz classic "Muskrat Ramble", co-written by Kid Ory. The suit was brought by Ory's daughter Babette, who held the copyright at the time. Since decades had already passed from the time McDonald composed his song in 1965, Ory based her suit on a new version of it recorded by McDonald in 1999. The court however upheld McDonald's laches defense, noting that Ory and her father were aware of the original version of "Fixin'", with the same section in question, for some three decades without bringing a suit until 2003, and dismissed the suit. In 2006, Ory was ordered to pay McDonald $750,000 for attorney fees, and had to sell her copyrights to do so.

In 2004, Country Joe re-formed some original members of Country Joe and The Fish as the Country Joe Band – Bruce Barthol, David Bennett Cohen, and Gary "Chicken" Hirsh. The band toured Los Angeles, Berkeley, Bolinas, Sebastopol, Grants Pass, Eugene, Portland and Seattle. They then made a 10-stop tour of the United Kingdom and played at the Isle of Wight and London. Following that came the New York tour which included a Woodstock reunion performance followed by an appearance at the New York State Museum in Albany. Returning to the West Coast the band played in Marin County and Mendocino County, California, the World Peace Music Awards in San Francisco and at the Oakland Museum of California as part of an exhibit on the Vietnam War.

In the spring of 2005, McDonald joined a larger protest against California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger's proposed budget cuts at the California State Capital Building.

In the fall of 2005, political commentator Bill O'Reilly compared McDonald[3] to Cuban President Fidel Castro, remarking on McDonald's involvement in Cindy Sheehan's protests against the Iraq War.[4]

Discography

[5]

  • Tonight I'm Singing Just for You (1969)
  • Thinking of Woody Guthrie (1969)
  • War War War (1971)
  • Hold On It's Coming (1971)
  • Paris Sessions (1972)
  • Incredible! Live (Live Album) (1972)
  • Country Joe (1975)
  • Love Is a Fire (1976)
  • Paradise With an Ocean View (1977)
  • Goodbye Blues (1977)
  • Rock N Roll from Planet Earth (1978)
  • On My Own (1980)
  • Into The Fray (1982)
  • Child's Play (1983)
  • Classics Best Of (1989)
  • Peace On Earth (1989)
  • Superstitious Blues (1991)
  • Vietnam Experience (1995)
  • Carry On (1996)
  • Something Borrowed, Something New (The Best Of) (1998)
  • A Reflection on Changing Times The Best Of (2003)
  • Vanguard Visionaries (2007)[6]

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Richard Brenneman, "Country Joe McDonald Revives Anti-War Anthem", Berkeley Daily Planet, April 16, 2004, accessed July 18, 2007.
  2. 2.0 2.1 Country Joe McDonald, "That Notorious Cheer", accessed October 10, 2007.
  3. Countryjoe.com
  4. Mediamatters.org
  5. Allmusic.com, Discography
  6. Answers.com, Discography

External links

Smallwikipedialogo
This page uses content from the English Wikipedia. The original article was at Country Joe McDonald. The list of authors can be seen in the page history.

Also on Fandom

Random Wiki